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Coronation of Emperor Jonathan I

Several dignitaries visited the Imperial Residence today to attend the coronation of His Imperial Majesty Jonathan I as Emperor of Austenasia.

The Emperor with his guests – left to right: Premier James Puchowski of Landashir, Emperor Taeglan I Nihilus of Reyla, Emperor Jonathan I of Austenasia, Countess Eritoshi of Memphis, Air Chief Marshal Sir Micheal Mitchell.

Jonathan I, who ascended to the Throne after the abdication of Declan I last month, crowned himself in his capacity as Founder of Austenasia with the Imperial Diadem on the spot from which he sent the Declaration of Independence via e-mail in September 2008. The guests present were Emperor Taeglan I Nihilus of Reyla, Premier James Puchowski of Landashir, Countess Eritoshi of Memphis, and Air Chief Marshal Sir Micheal Mitchell the head of the Imperial Air Force.

Declan I had been invited but was unable to attend due to illness. Acting Prime Minister Lord Marshal William was also unable to attend due to having made prior commitments.

A photographer from local newspaper the Sutton Guardian took photographs and video of the guests and the preparations for the coronation and recorded the ceremony, which began at roughly 11:45. The coronation ceremony was based on the guidelines laid out in the 2011 Constitution and the precedent set by the 2009 coronation of Emperor Terry I (now Emperor Father), with influences from the coronations of the British and Russian monarchs.

The ceremony began with Jonathan I – wearing the Imperial Robes and Imperial Chain – being seated on a chair on the exact spot where Terry I was crowned and from where the Declaration of Independence was sent. He swore an oath to rule fairly and wisely, defend Austenasia and its people, and to uphold and abide by the law. He was then annointed with holy oil before being handed the Imperial Sceptre by Countess Eritoshi, who helped to officiate as Leader of Ceremonies.

With the words “as Founder I crown myself, Imperator Caesar Jonathan Augustus, Emperor of Austenasia”, Jonathan I then placed the Imperial Diadem on his head to shouts of “Vivat Imperator” as those present bowed and saluted before the Austenasian national anthem was played.

After the ceremony, Jonathan I and Taeglan I signed the Treaty of Wrythe, in which both emperors formally gave recognition of each other’s full imperial rank while agreeing that either of them addressing another as “Emperor” would not constitute recognition of imperial rank under the Carshaltonian political doctrine of Imperium without the consent of the other, and reaffirmed an earlier treaty of friendship between the two states.

The ceremony over, Emperor Father Terry took photographs of the Emperor and his guests before joining them at the Racehorse, a pub in Carshalton, for lunch. There followed a quick visit to the (very) nearby Wessaxon constituent country of Orly and a brief (and unplanned) meeting with Lord Marshal William’s father before Taeglan I and Premier Puchowski departed.

The Emperor, his father, the Countess and Air Chief Marshal returned to the Imperial Residence, with the Air Chief Marshal and then the Countess also departing after a few hours of socialising with the Emperor and his sister Crown Princess Caroline.

The Sutton Guardian will most likely be publishing an article on the coronation on Thursday 28th February, once more bringing Austenasia to the attention of thousands of local Britons. This will be the third time the Empire has been featured in said paper, which ran articles on Austenasia in January 2009 and September 2011.

An album of photographs taken at the coronation can be seen by following this link.

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  1. Pete Leventis (Demetrius III)
    24 February 2013 at 11:32 pm

    Vivat Imperator! My new collegue!

    ~His Imperial Majesty the Eastern Emperor, Demetrius III, Monarch of Eleftheria

  2. Pete Leventis (Demetrius III)
    24 February 2013 at 11:37 pm

    I havent talked to you lately 😦

  1. 2 March 2013 at 11:38 am
  2. 1 January 2014 at 12:00 pm
  3. 2 April 2014 at 7:20 pm
  4. 14 October 2014 at 8:37 pm

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