Home > Austenasia > Codex Jonathanus enters into force

Codex Jonathanus enters into force

A copy of the Codex Jonathanus in Parliament Hall.

What has been described as “one of the most extensive pieces of legislation” in the history of small nations was adopted today as the long awaited Austenasian civil code came into force.

Known as the Codex Jonathanus, the civil code is an amended version of the Codex Justinianus, an extremely influential codification of Roman law ordered by Emperor Justinian I in the early 6th century. Laws related to archaic issues such as slavery have been removed, and some dealing with local matters amended to refer to Representatives, Town Councils and the like, but for the most part this civil code consists of genuine Roman laws passed between 146 and 532 AD.

The code, which is comprised of over five hundred laws, covers matters including contract and family law, debts, marriage, property, and the justice system. It will be used mostly by magistrates when deciding on how to settle disputes.

The Codex Jonathanus – meaning Code of Jonathan – was compiled by the Emperor, who started work on the massive project at the start of May last year, making use of an English translation of the Codex Justinianus. The adoption of the code was authorised by Parliament last week.

The Codex Justinianus, of which this code is effectively an abridged version, served as the civil code of the Roman Empire from 534 until 892, and has been described as one of the foundations of the western legal tradition. The adoption of the Codex Jonathanus, as well as having great practical benefits, has also strengthened the Roman inheritance of Austenasia.

A printed copy of the Codex has been stored in the Imperial Residence, and copies will be available upon request to be sent to any Representatives, judges, or magistrates. The Codex Jonathanus can be read online here.

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