Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Carshalton Methodist Church’

IGS Expedition revisits original route

The expedition approaches Gravelhill Wood.

An expedition of the Imperial Geographical Society (IGS) yesterday retraced the route of its original expedition in 2009, through woods and farmland south of the British village of Bletchingley.

The 2009 expedition was the very first launched by the IGS, which had then been in existence for barely two months. Twenty seven people participated in total, with it remaining to date the largest expedition of the IGS.

Yesterday’s expedition walked the same route as that taken in 2009, comparing the area today with how it was seven years ago. A small detour had to be taken to find an alternative spot for lunch, with the gate to the clearing used during the original expedition having been locked by the landowners.

There were only eight people on yesterday’s expedition; far smaller than the original, but numbering one more than last year’s May bank holiday expedition.

Yesterday’s expedition was led by Emperor Jonathan I, with other members of the Imperial Family taking part alongside members of Carshalton Methodist Church. A film of the expedition can be seen here.

Christmas 2015 celebrated in Austenasia

The Christmas trees in (left to right) Terentia Town Hall, the Imperial Residence, and New Richmond Town Hall.

The past few days have seen Christmas celebrated across the Empire.

On Christmas Day, Friday 25th, the populations of Wrythe and Zephyria attended a morning service at Carshalton Methodist Church. The Imperial Family then had Christmas dinner at the residence of the Boxalls (the maternal relatives of the Emperor).

On Boxing Day, Saturday 26th, roles were reversed with the Boxall family being hosted at the Imperial Residence by the Imperial Family. Also joining them was Princess Consort Hannah, the Emperor’s unmarried partner.

Emperor Jonathan I published his third annual Christmas broadcast on YouTube on Christmas Day, which can be heard here. In the speech, he reflected on the events of 2015 and on the meaning behind celebrations and anniversaries.

Furthermore, Pontifex Maximus Alexander III (also known as Bradley of Dullahan) published a Christmas encyclical, which can be read here.

The Austenasian Times wishes all its readers a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

IGS Expedition to Friday Street and nearby woods

The Imperial Geographical Society has conducted an expedition through woods to the south of the British hamlet of Friday Street.

The expedition was led by John of Zephyria, and included Emperor Jonathan I and Emperor Mother Margaret.

The expedition walks up a steep hill.

Since 2009, it has become customary for the IGS to launch an expedition on the first Monday of May exploring rural areas of Surrey, accompanied by several members of Carshalton Methodist Church.

This year, the turnout was unfortunately rather small; including the three Austenasians, only seven people took part in the expedition, compared with over twenty in 2009 and 2010.

The expedition set off south from Friday Street, turning west before reaching Leith Hill and then stopping for lunch at the village of Holmbury Saint Mary before walking north-east through Abinger Common to arrive back at its starting point.

After the expedition, its members travelled to the café at the nearby Denbies Wine Estate for refreshments.

Photographs and video clips were taken, and a short film of the expedition can be seen here.

Jonathan I speaks on the fifth anniversary of the Austenasian Civil War

Writing this, Our Imperial Majesty sits in a room where, five years ago today, we were as Crown Prince immediately before the outbreak of the Austenasian Civil War. We are in the Park Annexe of Carshalton Methodist Church as our sister Crown Princess Caroline sets up an event in the church hall next door. Five years ago today, however, she attended the Vestry Conference, called to arrange a peaceful solution to her claim to the Throne, which had passed the previous month from our father Terry I to Esmond III. Of course, the conference failed, and we came into this room to confront our sister after negotiations broke down. It was immediately after leaving here that she announced an intention to overthrow the Emperor and the Austenasian Civil War was declared.

Despite the small scale of the war in military terms – only two “battles” being fought, neither truly deserving of the title – it left a permanent mark on Austenasia. What was in theory a victory for parliamentary sovereignty and the rule of law over untempered hereditary right became a victory of the Throne over the Representatives.

Some have pointed out what could have been; had Esmond III been made Regent for an Empress Caroline, he and his army would have left Stanley Park – the school at which most government business took place after his ascension to the Throne – mere weeks before Caroline would have come of age to rule herself. Overlooking this solution cost the Empire much in terms of stability, and the reign of our predecessor likely would not have happened should Esmond have only been Regent.

However, neither would many other things immensely important to the modern-day Empire have taken place had not the civil war. We cannot change the past, but we must reflect on and learn from it. On a positive note, the war brought many benefits to the Empire: a massive increase in local knowledge of Austenasia, a military which functioned in practice as well as in theory, a balance between the power of the Prime Minister and of the Throne, a “golden age” of court culture, and ultimately the foundation of our friends the Orlian nations.

Despite an increasing tendency towards eccentric ideas once his power was secure, Esmond III showed himself to be a great leader during the Austenasian Civil War and the months after it. He is almost single-handedly responsible for the making of the modern day Austenasian Monarchy and for the position of the Empire among the Carshalton Nations; one can only image what great things he would have had a chance to do had his first three months on the Throne not have had to have been dedicated to holding on to it.

As we commemorate the fifth anniversary of the Austenasian Civil War, let us not only mourn the tragedy of a nation divided. Let us also reflect upon and appreciate the dynamic new order of things it brought in. Had the war never occurred, Austenasia may never have expanded beyond a small community of seven people. It was the war which resulted in us first reaching out to the wider world, and that, if nothing else, can only have been a positive outcome.

ICJA

Park Annexe of Carshalton Methodist Church, 7 March 2015

Imperial Family celebrates Christmas 2014

The Imperial Family at the Boxall residence on Boxing Day. Left to right: Emperor Father Terry, Emperor Jonathan I, Emperor Grandmother Joyce, Crown Princess Caroline, and Emperor Mother Margaret.

Christmas has been celebrated by the extended Austenasian Imperial Family over the past few days.

Christmas Day (Thursday 25th) begun with the immediate Imperial Family opening presents in Parliament Hall. The Emperor Father then went to visit an elderly friend for the morning while the rest of the family attended the Christmas morning service at Carshalton Methodist Church with Emperor Grandmother Joyce, the Boxall family (the relatives of Emperor Mother Margaret) and the population of Zephyria.

The Imperial Family and Boxalls then had Christmas lunch at the Imperial Residence, followed by opening presents and playing parlour games. Christmas Day ended with a light supper.

Emperor Jonathan I released his second Christmas broadcast on YouTube. This broadcast reflected on the events of 2014 and on the concept of family, and can be heard here.

On Boxing Day (Thursday 26th), the Boxalls hosted the Imperial Family for the afternoon and evening.

The Austenasian Times hopes all its readers have had a Merry Christmas, and wishes you all a happy 2015.

 

Emperor hosts fundraiser quiz night

The Emperor and Crown Princess address the quiz teams.

Yesterday evening, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor hosted a fundraising quiz night at Carshalton Methodist Church.

Emperor Jonathan I set up a quiz evening in a hall next to Carshalton Methodist Church as a means of fundraising for the construction of a cultural centre being built by his own church, the Greek Orthodox Church of Ss. Constantine and Helen. Money raised by the entry price was split between the two churches.

Emperor Mother Margaret and Crown Princess Caroline, both of whom regularly attend Carshalton Methodist, helped the Emperor prepare the hall for the quiz. Refreshments during a break in the middle were free, but the Crown Princess was also selling home-made cakes to raise money for a humanitarian trip to India she plans to go on with her school next year.

Over £150 was raised for Carshalton Methodist, St. Constantine’s, and the fund for Crown Princess Caroline’s India trip. The entire population of Greater Wrythe attended the quiz night, as did several members of Carshalton Methodist, with an overall attendance of over 30.

There were seven rounds, on subjects including history, geography, general knowledge, and famous quotations. The members of the winning team each got a notebook and pen as a prize.

IGS Expedition to Woldingham

The expedition walks through woodland near Woldingham.

The Imperial Geographical Society has conducted an expedition through woods and farmland to the south-west of the British town of Woldingham.

The expedition, which was led by John of Zephyria (Officer of the Austenasian Order and father of Lord Marshal William), consisted of ten people. These included Emperor Jonathan I and Emperor Mother Margaret.

The rest of the expedition’s members were from Carshalton Methodist Church, which organises a ramble on the first Monday of May to coincide with the annual IGS expedition.

The expedition encountered several farm animals – chickens, ducks, horses, cows and goats – in fields adjacent to the paths followed, and walked through some areas of beautiful bluebell woodland.  It also had a look inside St. Agatha’s Church, a tiny High Anglican church close to the route being followed.

A footpath which the expedition travelled along for part of the way has been named Paloma Path in memory of Rose (whose pedigree name was Bramarley Paloma of Carothan), who sadly died last month.

Photographs and video clips were taken, and a short film of the expedition can be seen here.