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Posts Tagged ‘History’

Emperor puts himself on trial

13 January 2016 1 comment

The first criminal trial since May 2009 has begun in Austenasia, with the Emperor himself on trial.

HIM Emperor Jonathan I has, in an unprecedented move, charged himself with three counts of treason against Esmond III for actions committed over December 2010 and January 2011 in regards to his role in bringing Declan I to power.

In the Emperor’s recent Christmas broadcast, he announced a desire to see the legality of his role in those events investigated in order to rectify any outstanding injustices.

A select committee of the Privy Council was gathered, which helped organise a trial.

The events in question took place during and after the War of the Orlian Reunification in December 2010, when the then Crown Prince Jonathan successfully orchestrated a conflict between the Carshalton Nations to bring Declan I to power as joint Monarch in opposition to Esmond III. Although the then Crown Prince admitted his role in events the following year, no legal action was ever taken against him.

With the trial taking place in the Imperial Court, the Emperor is by a technicality judge, defendant, and prosecutor. However, in the interests of simplicity and justice, the prosecution is being argued by Sir Sebastian Linden and the defence by King Adam I of Überstadt.

The trial is taking place over Skype due to differences in time zones between the prosecution and defence. As such, it will likely take several days. The smooth running of the government is not likely to be affected during this time.

More details about the trial will be made public as events unfold.

Jonathan I speaks on the fifth anniversary of the Austenasian Civil War

Writing this, Our Imperial Majesty sits in a room where, five years ago today, we were as Crown Prince immediately before the outbreak of the Austenasian Civil War. We are in the Park Annexe of Carshalton Methodist Church as our sister Crown Princess Caroline sets up an event in the church hall next door. Five years ago today, however, she attended the Vestry Conference, called to arrange a peaceful solution to her claim to the Throne, which had passed the previous month from our father Terry I to Esmond III. Of course, the conference failed, and we came into this room to confront our sister after negotiations broke down. It was immediately after leaving here that she announced an intention to overthrow the Emperor and the Austenasian Civil War was declared.

Despite the small scale of the war in military terms – only two “battles” being fought, neither truly deserving of the title – it left a permanent mark on Austenasia. What was in theory a victory for parliamentary sovereignty and the rule of law over untempered hereditary right became a victory of the Throne over the Representatives.

Some have pointed out what could have been; had Esmond III been made Regent for an Empress Caroline, he and his army would have left Stanley Park – the school at which most government business took place after his ascension to the Throne – mere weeks before Caroline would have come of age to rule herself. Overlooking this solution cost the Empire much in terms of stability, and the reign of our predecessor likely would not have happened should Esmond have only been Regent.

However, neither would many other things immensely important to the modern-day Empire have taken place had not the civil war. We cannot change the past, but we must reflect on and learn from it. On a positive note, the war brought many benefits to the Empire: a massive increase in local knowledge of Austenasia, a military which functioned in practice as well as in theory, a balance between the power of the Prime Minister and of the Throne, a “golden age” of court culture, and ultimately the foundation of our friends the Orlian nations.

Despite an increasing tendency towards eccentric ideas once his power was secure, Esmond III showed himself to be a great leader during the Austenasian Civil War and the months after it. He is almost single-handedly responsible for the making of the modern day Austenasian Monarchy and for the position of the Empire among the Carshalton Nations; one can only image what great things he would have had a chance to do had his first three months on the Throne not have had to have been dedicated to holding on to it.

As we commemorate the fifth anniversary of the Austenasian Civil War, let us not only mourn the tragedy of a nation divided. Let us also reflect upon and appreciate the dynamic new order of things it brought in. Had the war never occurred, Austenasia may never have expanded beyond a small community of seven people. It was the war which resulted in us first reaching out to the wider world, and that, if nothing else, can only have been a positive outcome.

ICJA

Park Annexe of Carshalton Methodist Church, 7 March 2015

One year anniversary of the Liberation of Orly celebrated

East Wrythe, the location of today’s celebration.

The first anniversary of the Liberation of Orly was today marked with a celebration in the Copanese Embassy at East Wrythe.

Tea and cakes were enjoyed by Emperor Jonathan I and Queen Emma of Copan, who was appointed monarch upon the Liberation one year ago.

They were joined by two prominent Orlians at the embassy, which, while under Austenasian sovereignty as an exclave of the capital, is administered under Copanese law due being under extraterritoriality. As East Wrythe is therefore in a sense both Austenasian and Orlian, it was felt to be the best location to celebrate the occasion.

The Liberation of Orly is the name given to the events of 24 June 2013, when citizens of Orly deposed Declan I and turned to the Emperor of Austenasia to restore legitimate government in Copan and the Grove, the two states which comprise Orly. Declan I had seized power over the Carshalton Nations in December 2010 by exploiting a power struggle between the then Emperor Esmond III and Crown Prince Jonathan, but had abdicated from the Austenasian Throne in January 2013. His deposition from the throne of Orly (and its re-division into Copan and the Grove) marked the end of foreign rule in the Carshalton Nations.

Jonathan I yesterday visited the Grove in a personal capacity to feed the wildlife there, an activity joyfully partaken in by the newly independent Orlians a year ago immediately after having deposed Declan I. The Emperor hinted that this may become an annual tradition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Report on archaeological dig published

The Imperial Geographical Society has published a report on its findings from the archaeological dig which took place under the patio in Wrythe Public Park between August and November last year.

The report, which can be found here, is in PowerPoint format, and contains photographs of several of the findings.

Categories: Wrythe Tags: , , ,

Archaeological dig put on hold due to rain

HIH Crown Prince Jonathan has announced that work on the archaeological dig currently underway in Wrythe Public Park is to be put on hold until the spring due to bad weather.

A map of NE Wrythe. The trench is in red, with the treestumps in green and a possible undiscovered stump in blue.
1: The Imperial Residence
2: Lawn and flowerbeds of Wrythe Public Park
3: The patio being excavated
4: 2 Imperial Rd
5: Commius Flats

The dig, which started on 16 August earlier this year and is organised by the Imperial Geographical Society, is excavating an area which had been under paving stones since before the Imperial Family moved to what is now the Imperial Residence in January 2004.

The trench which has been dug has so far unearthed various pieces of glass and pottery, an at present unidentified animal bone, several metal nails, and a two pence coin which dates the construction of the patio under which the dig is taking place to no earlier than 1992.

The trench has also unearthed a large tree stump with an extensive root system, formerly sealed under the patio – two tree stumps were already visible and used as steps down from Wrythe Public Park’s patio to 2 Imperial Road. With the discovery of this third tree stump, it is thought that there was once a row of trees marking the end of the now Imperial Residence’s garden before 2 Imperial Road (the garage) was built.

The last digging which took place was in early October – due to rain since then, further excavation has been continually postponed due to the soil in the trench becoming waterlogged. With rainfall yesterday, the Crown Prince (who is leading the dig) has announced that digging is being formally put on hold until drier weather.

Fans of Cool Barbie will recognise the area of the dig as being where a Dalek was imprisoned in Prisoners Freed. Thankfully, the diggers have not reported unearthing any hostile aliens yet.