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Posts Tagged ‘IGS’

Imperial Geographical Society’s May Expedition goes ahead to Navasota River

The bass caught by the Expedition to the Navasota

Friday 1st May saw a small expedition of the Imperial Geographical Expedition (IGS) undertaken to the Navasota River in Texas.

The expedition consisted of two people, namely King William I of Gradonia and his father.

William I, who in Austenasia serves as Representative of Nahona, put forward the idea after it was noted that the traditional IGS expedition annually undertaken at the start of each May would be unable to take place due to restrictions on movement enacted in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Every May since 2009 (not including 2018, when the Emperor was in Spain) has seen the IGS launch an expedition to an area of countryside in Surrey. This year, however, the traditional expedition was cancelled due to a lockdown being in force in the United Kingdom to combat the transmission of the coronavirus.

William I and his father were, however, able under American regulations to travel to an isolated spot by the Navasota River.

While there, they went fishing, and King William made a catch – a 6.1 pound bass – at an area which the expedition named Peter’s Promontory in honour of the fish-related miracle related in Matthew 17:24-27.

Some pieces of citrine quartz were also found in the area.

King William also led a small IGS expedition of two members on 9 February earlier this year, which explored the city of San Antonio and its Alamo Mission and river walk.

Coronavirus measures implemented as pandemic continues

On 16 March, three cases of suspected coronavirus infection were reported by the Austenasian Times. All three individuals have by now either tested negative for the coronavirus or stopped displaying symptoms.

Despite this good news, the ongoing pandemic and the reactions of governments around the world continue to affect life for all Austenasians, both residential and non-residential.

Palasia and Bregusland restricted travel last month, a fact reported by Lonely Planet in a recent article about the reactions of various “micronations” to the pandemic.

However, these are not the only towns of Austenasia to have implemented a response to the disease.

The Austenasian capital Wrythe, the towns of Theodosiopolis and Dragovina, and the Harlemum March are all under lockdown.

Theodosiopolis and Harlemum, which are both represented by Dionisiy I, have furthermore stocked up on protective masks and anti-viral medicine.

Kingeston, which consists of uninhabited parkland bordered by Canada, has declared a state of emergency, and is encouraging visitors to observe social distancing and wash their hands. Peach Ponds meanwhile, which likewise consists of parkland (albeit bordered by the USA) has taken a stricter approach, enforcing a stay-at-home and not accepting visitors.

In Mouzilo, the sole resident – Manolis Afentoulis, Duke of Thessalia – has implemented strict social distancing and remained within the borders of the crown dependency for over three weeks, working on various cultural projects.

With lockdowns and social distancing being enforced in the United Kingdom, United States, and other countries around the world, many activities which Austenasians would usually join outside the borders of Austenasia itself have also been cancelled.

Last weekend saw Western Easter unable to be celebrated by the Imperial Family by attending church with other Austenasians, as is customary. Likewise, Emperor Jonathan I and the other Orthodox Christians of Austenasia will be unable to observe Orthodox Easter this upcoming Sunday 19th with church attendance. The Emperor will instead be listening to a livestreamed service from the safety of the Imperial Residence.

Likewise, the Imperial Geographical Society conducts an expedition on the first Monday of May, but will not be doing so this year.

As long as the pandemic continues, similar measures and precautions will unfortunately have to be taken in order to ensure public health.

IGS Expedition to Tarsus

The Imperial Geographical Society yesterday conducted an expedition to Tarsus, the biblical hometown of St Paul the Apostle.

St Paul’s Well

The expedition was comprised of Lord Dionisiy Tezdzhan-Smahin and his wife Lady Mariia.

It was the first expedition to take place outside of Europe, and the first to not have included Emperor Jonathan I amongst its participants. This is a major step for the IGS, which since 2017 has been aiming to conduct an expedition not requiring the personal direction of the Emperor.

Tarsus is an ancient settlement, dating back to the Neolithic period and named by the Hittites.

The expedition first encountered the Danyal Makami or Mausoleum of Daniel, one of several claimants to be the tomb of the Prophet Daniel. This site is thought to have been identified as the prophet’s tomb by the Caliph Umar (r. 634-644).

The expedition then continued past a Roman section of the city walls to Saint Paul’s Well, a well situated next to the ruin of a Roman house claimed to have been that of St Paul himself. The well is twenty metres deep and still yields drinkable water. It is supposed that St Paul would have drunk from the well during his lifetime.

The Duke and Duchess continued by car to the Tarsus Waterfall, where the expedition concluded with lunch.

Expedition of the Imperial Geographical Society to Box Hill

The Imperial Geographical Society (IGS) earlier today conducted an expedition to Box Hill in Surrey.

The expedition pauses on a clearing on Box Hill.

The expedition traversed valleys and woodland around Box Hill on its way to the viewpoint at the top of the hill itself, which commands a spectacular view of Dorking and the surrounding countryside.

On their way up the hill, the expedition encountered a large bed of bluebells and some mysterious tiles embedded in the woodland floor.

Fourteen people took part in the expedition, including Emperor Jonathan I, the Emperor Mother, and Crown Princess Caroline. The route had been planned by John, former Baron of Zephyria.

This marks the twentieth expedition of the IGS, almost ten years to the day since its first was conducted on 4 May 2009.

A video of the expedition will soon be uploaded.

UPDATE – 3 October 2019: A video of the expedition can now be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKSUyeyNNWg

IGS Expedition to Dorking

Emperor Father Terry and Crown Princess Caroline arrive at the Watermill Inn pub.

The Emperor, Emperor Father, and Crown Princess earlier today embarked on the Imperial Geographical Society’s nineteenth expedition.

The Expedition travelled to the British town of Dorking. An initial plan to explore the town’s high street had to be cancelled due to a lack of parking spaces, and so the three instead went to a nearby pub for lunch.

While driving near the town, the expedition encountered a large statue of a cockerel, a famous local landmark.

The expedition was undertaken at the suggestion of Emperor Father Terry, primarily to give Crown Princess Caroline practice at driving her new car.

Despite the relatively uneventful trip, the expedition (and lunch out) was enjoyed by all.

Imperial Geographical Society Expedition to Soria

13 April 2018 1 comment

The church built over the 6th century hermitage of St Saturio; one of the most iconic sites of Soria.

The Imperial Geographical Society (IGS) yesterday undertook an expedition exploring sites of interest in the Spanish city of Soria, and following part of the course of the Duero River.

The expedition, the members of which consisted of Emperor Jonathan I and his sister Crown Princess Caroline, is the first of the IGS to have taken place outside of the United Kingdom.

The Emperor has been living in the Spanish city of Soria since September with his fiancée Princess Hannah, and will continue to do so until June.

The Crown Princess visited the imperial couple from Tuesday to Friday this week, and on Thursday 12th it was decided to designate a comprehensive tour of Soria’s sites of interest as an official IGS expedition.

The main sites visited on the tour of the city were:

  • An outdoor refuge for stray cats
  • The ruins of the Convent of St Francis (17th century) and of the church of St Ginés (12th century)
  • The churches of St John of Rabanera (12th century), Our Lady of the Hawthorn (16th century), and the Co-Cathedral of St Peter (16th century)
  • The Hermitages of St Saturio and Our Lady of Miron (both 6th century)
  • A hill behind the Hermitage of Miron from which a view of the ruins of Numantia (2nd century BC) can be seen
  • The high street in central Soria

IGS Expedition to Cheam and Nonsuch Parks

10 September 2017 1 comment

An area of open grassland in Nonsuch Park.

The Imperial Geographical Society yesterday conducted an expedition of exploration through Cheam Park and the adjoining Nonsuch Park.

The two parks together make up a large area of fields and woodland which straddles the border between the London Borough of Sutton and the county of Surrey.

The expedition of three was led by Emperor Jonathan I, and discovered a dry riverbed, some basic wooden shelters constructed in the woods, and some wild parakeets.

Views of various London landmarks, including Battersea Power Station, Wembley Stadium, and the BT Tower were available from high ground on Cheam Park.