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Posts Tagged ‘Imperial Edict’

Emperor Father named Pater Patriae on 60th birthday

In celebration of his sixtieth birthday, HIH Emperor Father Terry has been granted the unprecedented title of Pater Patriae by His Imperial Majesty the Emperor.

Jonathan I announced the bestowing of the title with the publication of an Imperial Edict this morning.

Pater Patriae, which literally translates to “Father of the Fatherland”, was a title originally conferred by the Roman Senate to individuals considered successors of Romulus. In recent centuries, the title has been used more widely to refer to the founding fathers of a country.

For Emperor Father Terry, the title will be translated “Father of the Nation.”

The unique honour was presented as a birthday present from the Emperor and People of Austenasia as a whole.

As such, supporting the Emperor’s decision to grant the title were the Prime Minister, the Consuls, and a vote of the House of Representatives.

The Imperial Edict conferred the title “in grateful recognition of his role as Father of the Nation as de facto co-Founder, first Emperor of Austenasia, and Head of the Ancient and Imperial House of Austen in addition to his other contributions towards the country.”

Imperium Day sees Emperor relinquish emergency powers

Emperor Jonathan I has relinquished his emergency powers nine days early in response to the end of the political strife that beset the nation during the last week of May.

In an Imperial Edict issued for 4 June, Imperium Day, the Emperor has officially restored the full authority of the Constitution, noting that it was to be overridden only for the shortest time necessary.

The emergency powers he assumed on 25 May were originally to be held until 13 June.

In the same Imperial Edict, the referendum scheduled for this month in which proposed constitutional amendments were to be voted on has been postponed indefinitely, until consensus in government is reached about the purpose and scope of any future constitutional reform.

Imperium Day is a public holiday annually celebrated each 4 June, celebrating the Roman heritage of Austenasia and its monarchy.

It has also been marked today with a donation to the Imperial Numismatic Museum from the Emperor, and Lord William Wilson has announced that a monument is under construction in Nahona.

Referendum on constitutional amendments called for 30 June

An Imperial Edict was passed on Friday 15th May in which Emperor Jonathan I formally proposed various amendments to the Constitution, to be voted on at the end of June.

This follows on from a broadcast by Prince Dionisiy in February, shortly after his election as Prime Minister, in which he proposed various changes to Austenasian government.

Work is currently underway on a system of “e-Government”, which will once completed provide an online system for the Austenasian electorate to easily vote on various legislative matters directly.

The constitutional amendments to be voted on at the end of June, however, primarily concern the other major change proposed by Prince Dionisiy, which is to replace the Prime Minister as head of government with the Consuls.

Currently, two consuls are annually appointed by the Prime Minister for a year-long term, and are in charge of judicial sentencing.

Under the proposed constitutional amendment, the consuls would instead be elected by the House of Representatives at the nomination of the Monarch, or by the public themselves should a third or more of the Representatives present alternative candidates.

Prince Dionisiy was elected on a platform part of which was to strengthen the Roman culture of Austenasia. Establishing the consulate as the head of executive government would be a further step towards consolidating the Empire’s Roman heritage.

Other more minor changes in the proposed amendments include removing the requirement for the Empire’s Archdukes (that of the Archduchesses was not required; a typo with discriminatory consequences) to give consent for the Monarch to bestow the titles of Augusta and Caesar outside of the Imperial Family, and to allow an abdicated Monarch or a clergyman to officiate in a coronation if the head of government is unavailable.

The amendments would also make the rules governing the institution of the Senate more flexible, giving Parliament more say over its composition and permitting the Princeps Senatus (its chair) to resign that post without leaving the Senate itself.

Should the proposed amendments be approved in referendum on 30 June, they will still require the support of over 80% of the House of Representatives, as well as Imperial Consent. They would comprise the Third Amendment, with the Constitution also having been amended in 2015 and 2018.

Should the Third Amendment pass, the changes – including the dissolution of the office of Prime Minister – would come into effect at midnight on the morning of 1 January 2021, although the process for electing the new system’s Consuls for that year would begin in December.

State Intelligence Agency publicly acknowledged

sialogo

The logo of the SIA, Austenasia’s secret service.

His Imperial Majesty the Emperor publicly confirmed the existence of the secretive State Intelligence Agency in an Imperial Edict published earlier today.

The existence of the State Intelligence Agency (SIA) had been kept a carefully guarded secret since its creation eight years ago today, on 8 August 2009.

The then Emperor Terry I had instructed his son the then Prime Minister, Crown Prince (now Emperor) Jonathan, to create an intelligence agency to guard the national security of the young Austenasian state.

Since then, the SIA has engaged in several information-gathering operations to protect the Empire against both foreign and domestic threats.

In today’s Edict, the Emperor relinquished direct control over the SIA. Iron Lord Daniel Dankovsky, Acting Representative of the newly-annexed town Jovanovo, has been appointed Director-General of the SIA.

The precise activities of the SIA will remain covert.

First IGS Expedition held under new rules

3 January 2017 1 comment

Emperor Mother Margaret and Emperor Father Terry photograph the Kingsmere pond on Wimbledon Common.

The extended Imperial Family yesterday embarked on their annual New Year’s walk on Wimbledon Common, classified as an Imperial Geographical Society expedition under new rules for the organisation.

In an Imperial Edict, Emperor Jonathan I laid out rules for the Imperial Geographical Society (IGS) in regards to its structure and the launching of expeditions.

Any excursion in which two or more IGS members are partaking may be made an official IGS expedition after obtaining authorisation from the Director of the IGS.

Yesterday’s walk, led by Lord Michael, was designated an IGS expedition with four of the eight taking part being members of the society.

It is traditional for the immediate Imperial Family to have a walk on Wimbledon Common with the Boxalls (the family of Emperor Mother Margaret) on New Year’s Day, with the walk moved to 2nd January should the 1st be a Sunday.

The expedition first explored woodland north of the famous Wimbledon Common Windmill, passing by the Queensmere and Kingsmere ponds, and then traversed the golf course and woodland south of the windmill.

In the Imperial Edict, Jonathan I also directed that IGS expeditions “must do everything that is reasonably possible to refrain from damaging the natural environment”.

The Imperial Geographical Society was founded in 2009. Yesterday’s expedition was the fifteenth since its foundation, and the third to Wimbledon Common.

National motto amended

The Austenasian coat of arms, which will soon be revised in light of the national motto being corrected.

The Austenasian coat of arms, which will soon be revised in light of the national motto being corrected.

In an Imperial Edict passed earlier today, Emperor Jonathan I made an amendment to the national motto of the Empire.

Since July 2011, the national motto of Austenasia had been “Imperator et Populum Austenasiae” (Emperor and People of Austenasia), based on the emblematic “S.P.Q.R.” of the Roman Empire.

However, it recently became known that the phrase was grammatically incorrect. “Populum” should instead have been “Populus”, and was changed to such earlier today.

This change will require a new depiction of the national coat of arms to be published, on which the motto is displayed.