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Posts Tagged ‘National monuments’

Imperium Park designated national monument

Lord Wilson at the unveiling of the Imperium Monument

A charter was signed on Wednesday 28th July bestowing national monument status on Imperium Park in Nahona.

The charter, signed by Emperor Jonathan I in his capacity as Minister for Culture and by Lord William Wilson, Representative of Nahona, provides for the maintenance and preservation of the park.

Spanning just over 140 square feet, Imperium Park is a recreational area dedicated to Austenasian and Imperial history.

It was unveiled on Independence Day 2020, with work having begun in May earlier that year.

The most prominent feature of Imperium Park is the Imperium Monument, composed of the Columna Passus Imperatori and the Vallum Austenum. The former is a limestone column inscribed with the names of the incumbent Augusti and Caesari at the time of its construction, whereas the latter is a perimeter wall inscribed with heraldry.

The park also contains a seating area and spaces for the display of temporary art exhibits. Work on the continued beautification and maintenance of the park is ongoing.

Imperium Park is only the third site to be granted national monument status, giving it official recognition as a “site or structure within Austenasia of importance to the culture and/or history” of the Empire.

Palasia Pet Cemetery designated national monument

On November 10th, a charter was signed which gave Palasia Pet Cemetery official national monument status.

Palasia Pet Cemetery is located in Joyce Memorial Garden in Palasia.

The status of national monument, created by the Monuments and Heritage Act 2017, is for sites or structures within Austenasia which are of cultural or historical significance to the nation.

Palasia Pet Cemetery is the second site to be granted the status. The first national monument was another pet cemetery, that of Wrythe, and the Ministry for Culture is also exploring the option of granting the status to a monument recently erected in Nahona.

Palasia Pet Cemetery was officially opened on 21 July earlier this year after the burial of Pickles, the family dog of Lord John Gordon. It is also the final resting place of a rabbit, Sasha.

Its status as a national monument now enshrines within law the commitment of the Representative of Palasia to make provision for the maintenance of the cemetery, and increases the legal penalty for damaging the site.

Wrythe Pet Cemetery officially designated as national monument

Wrythe Pet Cemetery, Austenasia’s first national monument.

In a charter finalised yesterday, Wrythe Pet Cemetery has become the first official national monument of the Empire of Austenasia.

The status of national monument, created by the Monuments and Heritage Act 2017, is for sites or structures within Austenasia which are of cultural or historical significance to the nation.

Wrythe Pet Cemetery is the first site to be officially designated as a national monument, but the January 2018 Ministerial Report of the Ministry for Culture declared an intention to ascertain before July which other sites or structures could be eligible for the status.

Founded in late 2008 soon after the Austenasian Declaration of Independence, Wrythe Pet Cemetery is the final resting place for many of the Imperial Family’s pets, and is located within Wrythe Public Park.

Its status as a national monument now enshrines within law the commitment of the Representative of Wrythe to make provision for the maintenance of the cemetery, and increases the penalty for damaging the site.