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Archive for April, 2018

Imperial Geographical Society Expedition to Soria

The church built over the 6th century hermitage of St Saturio; one of the most iconic sites of Soria.

The Imperial Geographical Society (IGS) yesterday undertook an expedition exploring sites of interest in the Spanish city of Soria, and following part of the course of the Duero River.

The expedition, the members of which consisted of Emperor Jonathan I and his sister Crown Princess Caroline, is the first of the IGS to have taken place outside of the United Kingdom.

The Emperor has been living in the Spanish city of Soria since September with his fiancée Princess Hannah, and will continue to do so until June.

The Crown Princess visited the imperial couple from Tuesday to Friday this week, and on Thursday 12th it was decided to designate a comprehensive tour of Soria’s sites of interest as an official IGS expedition.

The main sites visited on the tour of the city were:

  • An outdoor refuge for stray cats
  • The ruins of the Convent of St Francis (17th century) and of the church of St Ginés (12th century)
  • The churches of St John of Rabanera (12th century), Our Lady of the Hawthorn (16th century), and the Co-Cathedral of St Peter (16th century)
  • The Hermitages of St Saturio and Our Lady of Miron (both 6th century)
  • A hill behind the Hermitage of Miron from which a view of the ruins of Numantia (2nd century BC) can be seen
  • The high street in central Soria
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New site selected for Rushymia

One of the notices placed up around the prospective new site for Rushymia.

Notices have been placed around a large area of derelict land under a mile from the Imperial Residence announcing that the land is being considered for annexation by the Empire of Austenasia.

The notices – addressed to the British government and to the owners of the land – give a period of three months for an objection to be made before the Austenasian government will consider the land unwanted and thus eligible to be claimed.

Should no valid objections be raised, the land will be used for the re-founding of the Kingdom of Rushymia, as authorised by Parliament in October last year.

Despite the land measuring roughly 35 acres, its legal status is somewhat murky. Although most likely owned by the company which operates a landfill site to the east of the land, the land is unused for any industrial purposes and unmanaged by any parks or environmental services, and the precise identity of its owners could not be verified.

The land is often frequented by dog walkers, joggers, and amateur quadbike and moped drivers, who are easily able to access the ostensibly private land through large gaps in long-neglected fences.

Categories: Austenasia, Rushymia Tags: